• Installation view, Ride or Die, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Tammy Ljungblad.

    Installation view, Ride or Die, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Tammy Ljungblad.

  • Ed Blackburn (American, b. 1940)
    Painted Magazine Rodeo Rider, 1976
    acrylic on canvas
    108 x 156 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2004.10
    © Ed Blackburn

     

    Ed Blackburn (American, b. 1940)
    Painted Magazine Rodeo Rider, 1976
    acrylic on canvas
    108 x 156 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2004.10
    © Ed Blackburn

     

  • Gajin Fujita, (American, b. 1972)
    Ride or Die, 2005
    spray paint, paint marker, paint stick, gold and white gold leaf on wood panels
    84 x 132 1/2 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2005.39a–c
    © Gajin Fujita, courtesy of the artist and L.A. Louver Gallery. Photo: courtesy of the artist and L.A. Louver Gallery

     

    Gajin Fujita, (American, b. 1972)
    Ride or Die, 2005
    spray paint, paint marker, paint stick, gold and white gold leaf on wood panels
    84 x 132 1/2 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2005.39a–c
    © Gajin Fujita, courtesy of the artist and L.A. Louver Gallery. Photo: courtesy of the artist and L.A. Louver Gallery

     

  • Archie Scott Gobber, (American, b. 1965)
    In Loving Memory of You, 2008
    enamel on wood panels
    80 x 144 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Museum purchase made possible by gifts from the Collectors Forum and the Sosland Acquisition Fund, 2008.26
    © Archie Scott Gobber, courtesy of Haw Contemporary, Kansas City, MO. Photo: James Allison Photography, 2013

     

    Archie Scott Gobber, (American, b. 1965)
    In Loving Memory of You, 2008
    enamel on wood panels
    80 x 144 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Museum purchase made possible by gifts from the Collectors Forum and the Sosland Acquisition Fund, 2008.26
    © Archie Scott Gobber, courtesy of Haw Contemporary, Kansas City, MO. Photo: James Allison Photography, 2013

     

  • Jim Hodges, (American, b. 1957)
    Dot, 1999
    light bulbs and ceramic sockets on wood and metal panel
    31 1/2 x 31 1/2 x 5 inches. Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Gift of the William T. Kemper Charitable Trust, UMB Bank, n.a., Trustee, 1999.12
    © Jim Hodges. Photo: Dan Wayne

     

    Jim Hodges, (American, b. 1957)
    Dot, 1999
    light bulbs and ceramic sockets on wood and metal panel
    31 1/2 x 31 1/2 x 5 inches. Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Gift of the William T. Kemper Charitable Trust, UMB Bank, n.a., Trustee, 1999.12
    © Jim Hodges. Photo: Dan Wayne

     

  • Roger Shimomura, (American, b. 1939)
    Untitled, 1984
    acrylic on canvas
    60 1/2 x 72 1/4 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2000.13
    © Roger Shimomura. Photograph courtesy of Dan Wayn

    Roger Shimomura, (American, b. 1939)
    Untitled, 1984
    acrylic on canvas
    60 1/2 x 72 1/4 inches
    Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, Missouri
    Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Museum purchase, Enid and Crosby Kemper and William T. Kemper Acquisition Fund, 2000.13
    © Roger Shimomura. Photograph courtesy of Dan Wayn

Ride or Die

Friday, September 6, 2013 to Friday, December 6, 2013
Kemper at the Crossroads

Graffiti or “street art” has been largely synonymous with being made and viewed outdoors, on surfaces of public structures throughout cities worldwide, usually without permission. The visual vocabulary used by graffiti artists has often expressed modes of activism, creative thought, and personal and cultural insignias. Contemporary artists like Barry McGee (Twist) and many of his fellow “taggers” from San Francisco’s Mission District as well as others like Chicago native and KCAI alumnus Jordan Nickel (POSE) have made the transition from working outside to showing in galleries.* This is a development that has significantly changed the artistic practice of graffiti artists, prompting the making of three-dimensional and smaller compositions.

 

Visual signifiers and recognizable motifs often associated with graffiti culture, such as abstract graphic shapes, vibrant colors, bold lettering, and mural-like dimensions, are identifiable in works by artists outside of the genre. These works, culled from the Kemper Museum’s permanent collection, serve as examples of the influence that graffiti has had on artists showing in museum contexts.

 

New York-based artist Frank Stella’s Ohonoo (1994), part of his iconic Moby Dick series, evokes elements of graffiti such as distinct lines, sweeping gestures, and bright colors done on a monumental scale. Greg Miller and Archie Scott Gobber incorporate text into their works, another visual component used by graffiti artists and often inspired by comic book artists and illustrators. Graffiti is also intertwined with pop culture and politics as a means to deliver messages quickly and to a wide public audience. Roger Shimomura includes political figures and media icons in many of his works, such as Untitled (1984), to address sociopolitical issues of Asian American ethnicity, while Ed Blackburn’s Painted Magazine Rodeo Rider (1976) recontextualizes an iconic image of an American cowboy from small scale magazine ad to billboard-size status. In the painting Ride or Die (2005) Gajin Fujita (Hyde) incorporates multiple aspects of graffiti art informed by his years as an active member of two Los Angeles–based graffiti bombing crews.

 

*Graffiti artists use personal signatures or “tag names” to identify their works.