• Eric Fertman
    Vase, 2010
    metal, stained oak, flower
    32 x 19 x 7 1/2 inches
    Courtesy of Susan Inglett Gallery, New York, New York
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

    Eric Fertman
    Vase, 2010
    metal, stained oak, flower
    32 x 19 x 7 1/2 inches
    Courtesy of Susan Inglett Gallery, New York, New York
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

  • Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

    Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

  • Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

    Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

  • Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

    Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

  • Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

    Installation view, Eric Fertman, Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry, Kemper at the Crossroads, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art
    Photo: Bruce Mathews, 2012

Eric Fertman: Here's Your Hat, What's Your Hurry?

Friday, February 3, 2012 to Saturday, July 28, 2012
Kemper at the Crossroads

Eric Fertman creates sculpture and drawings that exist in a state of collision. Not the sort of impact from which we (or the works of art) emerge buried or bruised, but a pile-up of the imagination on a highway of free associations. Elegant survaces and awkward forms are inspired by imagery culled from memory, art history, sketchbooks, pop culture, and film–all treated as co-equals.