• Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Dead End Street, date unknown, 34 x 26 inches. 

    Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Dead End Street, date unknown, 34 x 26 inches. 

  • Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Desert Waves, 1991, 69½ x 46½ inches.

    Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Desert Waves, 1991, 69½ x 46½ inches.

  • Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Self Portrait, date unknown, 16½ x 20½ inches. 

    Marleen Gold (American, 1946–2020), Self Portrait, date unknown, 16½ x 20½ inches. 

Deconstructing Marleen Gold

Friday, March 4, 2022 to Sunday, June 12, 2022
Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

Kemper Museum’s Deconstructing exhibition series presents works that share themes and styles in relationship to one another, breaking down collecting histories and threads, geographical inspiration, and unexpected connections between them. Deconstructing Marleen Gold focuses on the work of artist Marleen Gold’s (American, 1946–2020) work, featuring artwork from Ron and Marleen Gold’s collection, as well as works from Kemper Museum’s Permanent Collection. 

Gold earned her B.F.A. in painting from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1979. She studied with professors Stanley Lewis (American, born 1941), Wilbur Niewald (American, born 1925), and Michael Walling (American, born 1935) whose work influenced Gold’s gestural style as seen throughout the exhibition. 

The work an artist collects also shines light on influences in their artistic career. Worrks by Fritz Scholder (American, 1937–2005) and Wolf Kahn (German, 1927–2020), among others from Gold’s collection are included in this exhibition. Gold was an accomplished equestrian in both English hunter and dressage styles, and equine imagery was a major part of her artistic practice. Her love of horses is expressed in her etchings and aquatints reminiscent of other accomplished artists such as Claudio Bravo (Chilean, born 1936) and Luis Jiménez (American, born 1940), who gave focus to images of horses during their career. Bravo’s Potro Rojo (1997) and Jiménez’s Mustang (1994), from the Kemper Museum Permanent Collection, are shown alongside Gold’s etchings, emphasizing the lineages present in certain subjects and shared interests among artists.

Through these works and others, this exhibition illuminates the dedicated artistic career of Marleen Gold through the lens of art collecting as well as the significance of visiting exhibitions and artists from around the world, which she enjoyed immensely throughout her life.

 

This exhibition is organized by Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and curated by Erin Dziedzic, director of curatorial affairs at Kemper Museum.