• Wilbur Niewald
    Self Portrait with Red Scarf, 1998
    oil on canvas
    25 x 20 inches
    Courtesy of the artist, Mission, Kansas
    © Wilbur Niewald. Photo: E. G. Schempf

    Wilbur Niewald
    Self Portrait with Red Scarf, 1998
    oil on canvas
    25 x 20 inches
    Courtesy of the artist, Mission, Kansas
    © Wilbur Niewald. Photo: E. G. Schempf

  • Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

    Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

    Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

    Installation view of Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait in the Barbara and Paul Uhlmann Gallery, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait

Friday, January 13, 2012 to Sunday, June 17, 2012
Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art is proud to present Wilbur Niewald: The Studio Portrait, the first museum exhibition to present portraiture by the Kansas City-based artist. Well known for his plein air painting, Niewald can often be found with easel and brushes at his favorite Kansas City locations, including Loose Park and Penn Valley Park. However, the artist has a long history of studio painting that includes both still lifes and portraits. Culled from private collections as well as from the artist's studio, these fourteen portraits—some commissioned, some personal—span more than forty years.

For me, the important portrait painting was done by the greatest painters. I like, for example, the portraits of Cézanne, Matisse, Giacometti and the American painter Alice Neel... and, of course, there are always the incomparable portraits of Rembrandt.
–Wilbur Niewald