General Information Permanent Collection Exhibitions Get Involved Educational Programs and Events Cafe Sebastienne Museum Shop  



Welcome
Visitor Services
History & Architecture
Facility Rental
Media Room
Social Media
Employment
Privacy Statement
Staff
Mission Statement

 
Current
Upcoming
Past
        Annual Fund
Membership
Gala
Giving Opportunities
Corporate Council
National Committee
Volunteers & Internships
Travel

Calendar
Visiting Artists
Tours
For Kids and Families
For Adults
For Teachers
Film/Concerts/Performances
Kemper ARTcasts
       
Catering
Lunch Menu
Dinner Menu
Brunch Menu
Facility Rental
News & Event Updates
       

Gala
Annual Fund
Books
Memberships
Corporate Council Memberships
National Committee Memberships
Studio Editions by Dale Chihuly
Video
Sales Policy

              View Calendar      

 Past Exhibition

Gestures, Fields, and Rising Suns


April 17, 2009–April 18, 2010

Kemper Museum

see past exhibition gallery
see upcoming exhibitions    

Drawn from the Kemper Museum’s permanent collection, this exhibition comprises works by a handful of artists who shaped the postwar American aesthetic of the 20th century. Early modernists were pivotal in the development of the dominant artistic style of the postwar period in America, Abstract Expressionism. By the early 1950s, artists challenged the grand gesture of Abstract Expressionism by eliminating brushwork altogether and staining or pouring wide “fields” of thinned paint directly onto unprimed canvas. Color Field painting reduced painting to its intrinsic formal elements—paint and the two-dimensional picture plane— eliminating extraneous associations. Through their bold, innovative investigations of color, form, and pure expression, these artists were the dawn of a new generation of artists in postwar America and, in many respects, continue to illuminate and inform artistic practices today.
 
Above: Hans Hofmann, Rising Sun, 1958; oil on canvas, 60 x 72 inches; Collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Bebe and Crosby Kemper Collection, Gift of the Enid and Crosby Kemper Foundation 2002.12